The Move to Pointe Aux Trembles

While I grapple with  Louise Dechêne’s “Habitants and Merchants in Seventeenth Century Montreal” and the fact that my SEO is absolutely defunct let us look at some of the information that is actually available on my family in Quebec. It really is like putting an enormous puzzle together.. By that I mean which son of a son of a son do you descend from? They may also all have the same name, such fun!  Again, the websites of PRDH and Nosorigines are very helpful in piecing the family units together, providing you have the correct start point .That being said, I have a running account with Ancestry which helps pull information together.

What do we know about Jean Beauchamp, considered a pioneer in Montreal along with his brother, Jacques? (Why the oldest brother, Pierre is never mentioned I do not know.) He was baptized at the church of St. Marguerite in La Rochelle, a maritime city in Aunis, on the east coast of France.

La Rochelle having an ancient history of exporting salt and wine, later as a point of migration to the New World. It was also home to a majority of Protestants until put under siege by Louis XIII. The boys grandfather had come from the hamlet of Nanthieul de Bourzac in France, a little to the southeast of La Rochelle, closer to Perigieux .The name Jean Beauchamp is listed as a Huguenot ancestor on the American website of the National Huguenot Association. Their maternal grandparents, Elie Roullett and Marie Barbonneau were married in the Protestant Temple in La Rochelle. The father, Michel, was a gardener in Ville Neuve a new town built for the Protestants after the siege. However, we see no evidence to date of the brothers  signing a document of “abjuration”, which they would have had to do to live in New France. That does not mean it doesn’t exist.

According to the Tanguay dictionary, Jean arrived in 1666 and married Jeanne Loisel the same year. I hope by now you have realized that most documents were written phonetically causing unknown upheaval in the genealogical world.

capture

Jean was an engagé , contracted to labour for 3 years until he was granted land on which to farm. Where they stayed during that time is unknown, though Jeanne had been raised at Marguerite Bourgeouy’s school. Perhaps she stayed there until he was settled, since the first child did not arrive until 3 years later. That child did not survive but 7 others did. From the PDRH (Research Program of Historical Demography-University of Montreal) website:

jean-beauchamp-jeanne-loiselle-family-1666

One can go from there to find the family which is wonderful. This record is known as a “union” on the website. We can see above that the couple moved to Pointe aux Trembles sometime before the birth of the child Jean, in 1676. It is the oldest rural parish on the island of Montreal.  A fort had been built there in 1670 to protect the eastern side of the island from the Iroquois. The village was established in 1674 inside it’s walls.

P aux Tr on old map.jpg

Old Map of Montreal showing location of Montreal to Point aux Trembles

The Supulcians were the seigneurs of Montreal and owned most of the land on the island.In the early days of Pointe Aux Trembles, a priest traveled to the home of Francois Bot to say mass on Sundays. Then in 1674, two churchwardens were elected to make arrangements for the building of a church. In her book, Louise Dechenes tells of the unbridled enthusiasm of the settlers for the new church, promising to contribute to the financing and building of it, which they did …to a point. It took the intendant’s threat of a lawsuit to get the church finished. When that was done, the priest needed a house and a collection would have to be taken for that. In the end, many priests ended up using their own money to build. Religious though they claimed to be, the settlers were not willing to give up their hard earned money on non-critical items. Tithes and seigneurial dues went unpaid for which the clergy hesitated to sue, since that would alienate an already unruly parish. When the church was finally established, the settlers were intent on running the parish which caused even more trouble. Still, they became attached to their curé and realized that “the parish” signaled a forging of a new community where they could create the society they longed for. Jean Beauchamp was among those who participated in the blessing of the new church.

 

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