Getting it Right

I suppose there are many reasons one would pursue their ancestors down the path and into the past, there to be confronted by errors in judgement, locked and half-open doors and at times utter incredulity.  In the space of the last 24 hours, I have been confronted by the wildest errors both in documents and online. It makes one want to laugh and cry at the same time.  This is not to say I am an expert by any means but seriously?

Look at the example below,JB Beauchamp anc. errors

Apparently, Jean’s father was born after him. Two names have ridiculous variations. Angelique Pambrum, Josephte Dit Doney  and apparently he married another man, Amable! Shall I go on? Shame on Ancestry for letting this happen.  Get as close to the actual docs as you can. In this case I am looking at Sprague and Frye’s The Genealogy of the First Metis Nation 2012. Jean and his wife Angleique Pangman were both born in 1800.

Now to the Glenbow Museum,

JB Beauchamp Glenbow errors

Now these people are are citing Sprague and Frye. Here we have Jean born in 1839 instead of 1829 as in the book (Table 1) to Marie Ann Goneville instead of Janeville. Who’s going to call up Sprague and Frye?

Last night as I was nearing the point of exhaustion, I decided to search the Daigneault family for records. I hit a few censuses. Census takers are the bane of a genealogist’s existence.  I submitted 3 corrections to ancestry. One of the transcribers unbelievably put the husband of the next family down as the spouse of the head of the family before. The other did not even absorb the initials on the census and put a boy down as a sister. The S was for “son”. That being said some of the censuses are almost illegible. Interestingly, I did not find that at all in Ireland and England.

The point is that some of us have to do the work because our ancestors didn’t. Most of my Metis relatives could not even read or write, never mind whether their scrip got ripped off or not.